• Toby ShorinToby Shorin, 7 years ago

    Hey your work has gotten much cleaner! I think you can go even more sophisticated at this point to avoid looking like the gajillion startup websites out there.

    Regarding your rate: you are undercharging. We creatives typically undervalue ourselves by a lot. It's sometimes hard to estimate, but try to make some realistic hypotheses about the value you are going to be providing to the client through your work. If it's a startup website that helps them land their seed investment, or a redesigned checkout flow that improves conversion by 3%-5%, that's a huge boost for the business.

    Your only limit is your own confidence. Next project you take, I encourage you to double or triple your asking rate. Ask for more. Charge for the value you provide. Most of all, respect yourself!

    16 points
    • Marcus H, 7 years ago

      Hi Toby, thanks for the feedback and kind words.

      I do realise that I provide more value than purely pushing pixels but it is my confidence (impostor syndrome) that is limiting me. I've stopped trying to charge by the hour and I'm moving towards fixed pricing at the moment.I recently purchased Brennan Dunn's DYFR (thanks Black Friday) so I can learn more about pricing on value.

      My learning isn't limited to design and I've started reading books about the business side of things. I'm a work in progress and I hope I can make major strides in design and freelancing/business over the coming 12 months.

      3 points
      • Toby ShorinToby Shorin, 7 years ago

        Haven't read that book but it supposedly has some great tips! That said, I firmly believe you don't need a book to learn how to charge more. Just do it.

        Seriously, triple your rate on your next project. You're going to get away with it, and when you do, you'll realize how bullshit imposter syndrome is, and that the number you charge is uncorrelated to your self-worth. Design your life

        4 points
      • Adam RasheedAdam Rasheed, 7 years ago

        It's an amazing ebook and worth every penny. I I stopped billing hourly this year and effectively tripled my hourly rate. Funny how that works

        You do need your prices though. Raise them till you're uncomfortable and then raise them a bit more.

        1 point
        • Marcus H, 7 years ago

          Tripled? That's crazy! What did you triple from if you don't mind me asking? Also are you the same Adam Rasheed that has some video's on Youtube?

          Anyway, I'm going to start the book tomorrow, are there any other books you'd recommend?

          1 point
          • Matt DunnMatt Dunn, 7 years ago

            FreshBooks has a nice little [free ebook]((https://www.freshbooks.com/blog/breakingthetimebarrier/)) about pricing too.

            1 point
            • Marcus H, 7 years ago

              I've actually read that book, it was a great read and loved the writing style. I helped me move away from hourly to fixed pricing but I don't believe I'm ready to bill on value just yet. I think I need some more solid projects behind me first and more experience before I make the jump.

              0 points
          • Adam RasheedAdam Rasheed, 7 years ago

            I was charging $25-$30/hour depending on the job, and now my effective rate is $75/$150 per hour depending on the job. Keep in mind these aren't a regular amount of hours every week.

            And you mean this YouTube channel? Yeah that's mine.I'm releasing a Sketch tutorial series I'm excited for :)

            Design is a Job by Mike Monteiro (he was in the F*ck You Pay Me Video) is a must-read. I highly recommend it.

            1 point
            • Marcus H, 7 years ago

              A similar rate what I'm charging although from looking at your portfolio you design and create and I only do the former. No such thing as regular hours with freelancing (for me anyway), I averaged between 10-20 hours a week this year but would like to get closer to 25.

              I knew I'd seen your name somewhere.

              I have that book but haven't got round to reading it yet and have heard nothing but praise for it. I guess it'll be next on the list after I've finished Double Your Freelancing Rates by Brennan Dunn, pretty apt based on the advice I've got here :)

              1 point